Smoke on the Water (Sisters of the Craft) Book photo 1
June 30th, 2015 by admin

Smoke on the Water (Sisters of the Craft) Book
Book Title:

Smoke on the Water (Sisters of the Craft)

by: St. Martin’s Paperbacks

Product rating: 4.6 with 22 reviews


Reunited after four hundred years, three sisters join together to vanquish the power that tore them apart…and embrace the sorcery that is their birthright.

Abandoned as an infant, Willow Black spent her childhood in foster care, the object of whispers and pity…and rumors about being certifiably crazy. Telling your young friends that you can foresee the future-and summon the rain-is a surefire way to end up in the psychiatric ward. But when Dr. Sebastian Frasier arrives at the facility, Willow’s whole life takes a turn. Sebastian is the handsomest man she’s ever actually laid eyes on-even though he has been in Willow’s visions for years. But not even she could have predicted the storm of passion that engulfs them both. With Sebastian by her side, Willow is emboldened to embrace her history, and the sisters she never knew. Soon, the true power in her blood awakes-and the battle she was born to fight begins. While the temp est rages, Willow must depend on the friends and family she’s found-and the man she has loved forever…

In the final book of this enchanting new trilogy, New York Times bestselling author Lori Handeland sweeps readers into a bewitching tale of secrets, sisterhood, and the stunning magic of love.

Posted in Paranormal Tagged with: , , , ,

The Sisters Are Alright Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America Book picture 01
May 16th, 2015 by admin

The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America Book
Book Title:

The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America

by: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

Product rating: 4.8 with 23 reviews


What’s wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!

The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti–black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves.

When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra—servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel—followed close behind. In the ’60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and hit song lyrics. Emancipation may have happened more than 150 years ago, but America still won’t let a sister be free from this coven of caricatures.

Tamara Winfrey Harris delves into marriage, motherhood, health, sexuality, beauty, and more, taking sharp aim at pervasive stereotypes about black women. She counters warped prejudices with the straight-up truth about being a black woman in America. “We have facets like diamonds,” she writes. “The trouble is the people who refuse to see us sparkling.”

Posted in African-American Studies Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,