Ever After High A Semi-Charming Kind of Life (A School Story) Book picture 001
July 21st, 2015 by admin

Ever After High: A Semi-Charming Kind of Life (A School Story) Book
Book Title:

Ever After High: A Semi-Charming Kind of Life (A School Story)

by: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Product rating: 4.8 with 10 reviews


Darling Charming is bored in Damsel-In-Distressing class. She’d much rather be in Hero Training with her brothers. The only thing is, she has secretly been helping her brother Dexter ace the class. If anyone finds out, a scandal would erupt at Ever After High. One of the most prestigious families in town, the Charmings have a reputation to uphold. Darling is destined to be a damsel…but this Rebel may want to decide her own destiny! Why should princes have all the fun?
Don’t miss the companion activity book, Hero Training!

Posted in School Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

Ever After High Hero Training A Destiny Do-Over Diary Book picture 1
June 11th, 2015 by admin

Ever After High: Hero Training: A Destiny Do-Over Diary Book
Book Title:

Ever After High: Hero Training: A Destiny Do-Over Diary

by: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Product rating: 5.0 with 1 reviews


Enroll in Hero Training class with Dexter and Daring Charming, and write your own destiny! If you were preparing to be a professional rescuer, what skills would you need to learn? What if princesses were allowed to joust? Flip the script in this hexcellent activity book!
Companion to the novel A Semi-Charming Kind of Life!

Posted in Fantasy & Magic Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

Humans Are Underrated What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will Book photo 1
June 7th, 2015 by admin

Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will Book
Book Title:

Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will

by: Portfolio

Product rating: 5.0 with 1 reviews


As technology races ahead, what will people do better than computers?

What hope will there be for us when computers can drive cars better than humans, predict Supreme Court decisions better than legal experts, identify faces, scurry helpfully around offices and factories, even perform some surgeries, all faster, more reliably, and less expensively than people?

It’s easy to imagine a nightmare scenario in which computers simply take over most of the tasks that people now get paid to do. While we’ll still need high-level decision makers and computer developers, those tasks won’t keep most working-age people employed or allow their living standard to rise. The unavoidable question—will millions of people lose out, unable to best the machine?—is increasingly dominating business, education, economics, and policy.

The bestselling author of Talent Is Overrated explains how the skills the economy values are changing in historic ways. The abilities that will prove most essential to our success are no longer the technical, classroom-taught left-brain skills that economic advances have demanded from workers in the past. Instead, our greatest advantage lies in what we humans are most powerfully driven to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human abilities—empathy, creativity, social sensitivity, storytelling, humor, building relationships, and expressing ourselves with greater power than logic can ever achieve. This is how we create durable value that is not easily replicated by technology—because we’re hardwired to want it from humans.

These high-value skills create tremendous competitive advantage—more devoted customers, stronger cultures, breakthrough ideas, and more effective teams. And while many of us regard these abilities as innate traits—“he’s a real people person,” “she’s naturally creative”—it turns out they can all be developed. They’re already being developed in a range of far-sighted organizations, such as:

• the Cleveland Clinic, which emphasizes empathy training of doctors and all employees to improve patient outcomes and lower medical costs;
• the U.S. Army, which has revolutionized its training to focus on human interaction, leading to stronger teams and greater success in real-world missions;
• Stanford Business School, which has overhauled its curriculum to teach interpersonal skills through human-to-human experiences.

As technology advances, we shouldn’t focus on beating computers at what they do—we’ll lose that contest. Instead, we must develop our most essential human abilities and teach our kids to value not just technology but also the richness of interpersonal experience. They will be the most valuable people in our world because of it. Colvin proves that to a far greater degree than most of us ever imagined, we already have what it takes to be great.

Posted in Guides Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hell or High Water (The Deep Six) Book photo 01
June 4th, 2015 by admin

Hell or High Water (The Deep Six) Book
Book Title:

Hell or High Water (The Deep Six)

by: Sourcebooks Casablanca

Product rating: 4.5 with 75 reviews


A brand new romantic suspense series from the author of the New York Times bestselling Black Knights, Inc. series, THE DEEP SIX features six former SEALS on super-secret black ops, and feisty heroines who know how to handle both lethal weapons and alpha men.

Only two things could make former Navy SEAL Leo Anderson return to the world of weapons and warfare. First, a capsule of chemical weapons lost on the ocean floor, and second, a plea for assistance from the one woman he can’t seem to forget-CIA Agent Olivia Mortier.

Now, working together to race against the clock and a deadly terrorist faction, Leo and Olivia must find the missing capsule, all the while battling the intense desire burning between them. If they can survive, can their growing attraction become more than just a momentary flare?

Praise for Full Throttle:
“Quick witted and action packed.” –RT Book Reviews, 4 stars
“Heart-pounding…Walker has outdone herself.” –Publishers Weekly, Starred Review
“Amazing…took me on the ride of my life.” -The Book Whisperer
“A wonderful, intense story with fabulous romantic tension.” -Tome Tender

Posted in Contemporary Tagged with: , , , ,

Mission High One School, How Experts Tried to Fail It, and the Students and Teachers Who Made It Triumph Book photo 001
May 28th, 2015 by admin

Mission High: One School, How Experts Tried to Fail It, and the Students and Teachers Who Made It Triumph Book
Book Title:

Mission High: One School, How Experts Tried to Fail It, and the Students and Teachers Who Made It Triumph

by: Nation Books

Product rating: 5.0 with 1 reviews


“This book is a godsend … a moving portrait for anyone wanting to go beyond the simplified labels and metrics and really understand an urban high school, and its highly individual, resilient, eager and brilliant students and educators.” —Dave Eggers, co-founder, 826 National and ScholarMatch

Darrell is a reflective, brilliant young man, who never thought of himself as a good student. He always struggled with his reading and writing skills. Darrell’s father, a single parent, couldn’t afford private tutors. By the end of middle school, Darrell’s grades and his confidence were at an all time low. Then everything changed.

When education journalist Kristina Rizga first met Darrell at Mission High School, he was taking AP calculus class, writing a ten-page research paper, and had received several college acceptance letters. And Darrell was not an exception. More than 80 percent of Mission High seniors go to college every year, even though the school teaches large numbers of English learners and students from poor families.

So, why has the federal government been threatening to close Mission High—and schools like it across the country?

The United States has been on a century long road toward increased standardization in our public schools, which resulted in a system that reduces the quality of education to primarily one metric: standardized test scores. According to this number, Mission High is a “low-performing” school even though its college enrollment, graduation, attendance rates and student surveys are some of the best in the country.

The qualities that matter the most in learning—skills like critical thinking, intellectual engagement, resilience, empathy, self-management, and cultural flexibility—can’t be measured by multiple-choice questions designed by distant testing companies, Rizga argues, but they can be detected by skilled teachers in effective, personalized and humane classrooms that work for all students, not just the most motivated ones.

Based on four years of reporting with unprecedented access, the unforgettable, intimate stories in these pages throw open the doors to America’s most talked about—and arguably least understood—public school classrooms where the largely invisible voices of our smart, resilient students and their committed educators can offer a clear and hopeful blueprint for what it takes to help all students succeed.

Posted in Teenagers Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,