Restoring the Brain Neurofeedback as an Integrative Approach to Health Book photo 01
August 18th, 2015 by admin

Restoring the Brain: Neurofeedback as an Integrative Approach to Health Book
Book Title:

Restoring the Brain: Neurofeedback as an Integrative Approach to Health

by: CRC Press

Product rating: 5.0 with 2 reviews


Restoring the Brain: Neurofeedback as an Integrative Approach describes the history and process by which neurofeedback has become an effective tool for treating many mental and behavioral health conditions. It explains how new brain research and improvements in imaging technology allow for a new conceptualization of the brain. It also discusses how biomedical factors can degrade brain functioning and cause a wide range of symptoms of mental disorders.

The book is written in an accessible style for easy understanding and application to classification and treatment. It shares the clinical experiences of practitioners working with specific symptom constellations generally categorized by a DSM diagnostic label. It examines the brain as a self-regulating communications system and discusses how much of mental dysfunction can be understood as acquired brain behavior that can be redirected with the help of EEG-based neurofeedback. It describes principles and practices of integrating neurofeedback that make redirection possible.

Recent discoveries on the neuroelectrical properties of the brain illuminate the possibilities of combining innovative neurotherapy techniques with integrative medicine to achieve optimal brain function. Case studies of clinical applications highlight the effectiveness of neurofeedback in treating autism, ADHD, and trauma, particularly PTSD. Integrative approaches are the future of health care, and neurofeedback will play an increasingly significant role. Restoring the Brain: Neurofeedback as an Integrative Approach is an essential reference for all mental health professionals and those with an interest in the use and practice of neurofeedback.

Posted in Neuropsychology Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Switch On Your Brain The Key to Peak Happiness, Thinking, and Health Book photo 1
August 3rd, 2015 by admin

Switch On Your Brain: The Key to Peak Happiness, Thinking, and Health Book
Book Title:

Switch On Your Brain: The Key to Peak Happiness, Thinking, and Health

by: Baker Books

Product rating: 4.6 with 491 reviews


According to researchers, the vast majority–a whopping 75-98 percent–of the illnesses that plague us today are a direct result of our thought life. What we think about truly affects us both physically and emotionally. In fact, fear alone triggers more than 1,400 known physical and chemical responses in our bodies, activating more than thirty different hormones! Today our culture is undergoing an epidemic of toxic thoughts that, left unchecked, create ideal conditions for illnesses.

Supported by current scientific and medical research, Dr. Caroline Leaf gives readers a prescription for better health and wholeness through correct thinking patterns, declaring that we are not victims of our biology. She shares with readers the “switch” in our brains that enables us to live happier, healthier, more enjoyable lives where we achieve our goals, maintain our weight, and even become more intelligent. She shows us how to choose life, get our minds under control, and reap the benefits of a detoxed thought life.

Posted in Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

Reset Your Child's Brain A Four-Week Plan to End Meltdowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen-Time Book photo 01
July 30th, 2015 by admin

Reset Your Child's Brain: A Four-Week Plan to End Meltdowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen-Time Book
Book Title:

Reset Your Child’s Brain: A Four-Week Plan to End Meltdowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen-Time

by: New World Library

Product rating: 5.0 with 6 reviews


A no-cost, nonpharmaceutical treatment plan for children with behavioral and mental health challenges

Increasing numbers of parents grapple with children who are acting out without obvious reason. Revved up and irritable, many of these children are diagnosed with ADHD, bipolar illness, autism, or other disorders but don’t respond well to treatment. They are then medicated, often with poor results and unwanted side effects. Based on emerging scientific research and extensive clinical experience, integrative child psychiatrist Dr. Victoria Dunckley has pioneered a four-week program to treat the frequent underlying cause, Electronic Screen Syndrome (ESS).

Dr. Dunckley has found that everyday use of interactive screen devices — such as computers, video games, smartphones, and tablets — can easily overstimulate a child’s nervous system, triggering a variety of stubborn symptoms. In contrast, she’s discovered that a strict electronic fast single-handedly improves mood, focus, sleep, and behavior, regardless of the child’s diagnosis.

Offered now in this book, this simple intervention can produce a life-changing shift in brain function — all without cost or medication. Dr. Dunckley provides hope for parents who feel that their child has been misdiagnosed or inappropriately medicated, by presenting an alternative explanation for their child’s difficulties and a concrete plan for treating them.

Posted in Emotions Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Brainstorm The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain Book photo 001
July 2nd, 2015 by admin

Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain Book
Book Title:

Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain

by: Tarcher

Product rating: 4.3 with 147 reviews


In this New York Times–bestselling book, Dr. Daniel Siegel shows parents how to turn one of the most challenging developmental periods in their children’s lives into one of the most rewarding.

Between the ages of twelve and twenty-four, the brain changes in important and, at times, challenging ways. In Brainstorm, Dr. Daniel Siegel busts a number of commonly held myths about adolescence—for example, that it is merely a stage of “immaturity” filled with often “crazy” behavior. According to Siegel, during adolescence we learn vital skills, such as how to leave home and enter the larger world, connect deeply with others, and safely experiment and take risks.

Drawing on important new research in the field of interpersonal neurobiology, Siegel explores exciting ways in which understanding how the brain functions can improve the lives of adolescents, making their relationships more fulfilling and less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.

Posted in Adolescent Psychology Tagged with: , , , , ,

Think Like a Freak The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain Book photo 01
June 6th, 2015 by admin

Think Like a Freak: The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain Book
Book Title:

Think Like a Freak: The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain

by: William Morrow Paperbacks

Product rating: 4.1 with 804 reviews


Now in Paperback—the New York Times bestsellerand follow up to the revolutionary bestsellers Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics—with a new author Q&A.

With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner take us inside their thought process and teach us all how to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally. In Think Like A Freak, they offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems, whether your interest lies in minor lifehacks or major global reforms. The topics range from business to philanthropy to sports to politics, all with the goal of retraining your brain. Along the way, you’ll learn the secrets of a Japanese hot-dog-eating champion, the reason an Australian doctor swallowed a batch of dangerous bacteria, and why Nigerian e-mail scammers make a point of saying they’re from Nigeria.

Levitt and Dubner plainly see the world like no one else. Now you can too. Never before have such iconoclastic thinkers been so revealing—and so much fun to read.

Malcolm Gladwell
Malcolm Gladwell Reviews Think Like a Freak

In one of the many wonderful moments in Think Like a Freak, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner ask the question: Who is easier to fool—kids or adults? The obvious answer, of course, is kids. The cliché is about taking candy from a baby, not a grown man. But instead of accepting conventional wisdom as fact, the two sit down with the magician Alex Stone—someone in the business of fooling people—and ask him what he thinks. And his answer? Adults.

Stone gave the example of the staple of magic tricks, the “double lift,” where two cards are presented as one. It’s how a magician can seemingly bury a card that you have selected at random and then miraculously retrieve it. Stone has done the double lift countless times in his career, and he says it is kids—overwhelmingly—who see through it. Why? The magician’s job is to present a series of cues—to guide the attention of his audience—and adults are really good at following cues and paying attention. Kids aren’t. Their gaze wanders. Adults have a set of expectations and assumptions about the way the world works, which makes them vulnerable to a profession that tries to exploit those expectations and assumptions. Kids don’t know enough to be exploited. Kids are more curious. They don’t overthink problems; they’re more likely to understand that the basis of the trick is something really, really simple. And most of all—and this is my favorite—kids are shorter than adults, so they quite literally see the trick from a different and more revealing angle.

Think Like a Freak is not a book about how to understand magic tricks. That’s what Dubner and Levitt’s first two books—Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics—were about. It’s about the attitude we need to take towards the tricks and the problems that the world throws at us. Dubner and Levitt have a set of prescriptions about what that attitude comes down to, but at its root it comes down to putting yourself in the mind of the child, gazing upwards at the double lift: free yourself from expectations, be prepared for a really really simple explanation, and let your attention wander from time to time.

The two briefly revisit their famous argument from their first book about the link between the surge in abortions in the 1970s and the fall in violent crime twenty years later. Their point is not to reargue that particular claim. It is to point out that we shouldn’t avoid arguments like that just because they leave us a bit squeamish. They also tell the story of the Australian doctor Barry Marshall, who overturned years of received wisdom when he proved that ulcers are caused by gastric bacteria, not spicy food and stress. That idea was more than heretical at first. It was absurd. It was the kind of random idea that only a child would have. But Dubner and Levitt’s point, in their utterly captivating new book, is that following your curiosity—even to the most heretical and absurd end—makes the world a better place. It is also a lot of fun.


Posted in Decision-Making & Problem Solving Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

Rewire Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destruc tive Behavior Book image 001
May 25th, 2015 by admin

Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destruc tive Behavior Book
Book Title:

Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destruc tive Behavior

by: Plume

Product rating: 4.4 with 43 reviews


The bestselling author of Undoing Depression offers a brain-based guide to permanently ending bad habits

Richard O’Connor’s bestselling book Undoing Depression has become a touchstone in the field, helping thousands of therapists and patients overcome depressive patterns. In Rewire, O’Connor expands those ideas, showing how we actually have two brains—a conscious deliberate self and an automatic self that makes most of our decisions—and how we can train the latter to ignore distractions, withstand temptations, and interrupt reflexive, self-sabotaging responses. Rewire gives readers a road–map to overcoming the most common self-destructive habits, including procrastination, excessive worrying, internet addiction, overeating, risk-taking, and self-medication, among others.

Posted in Personal Transformation Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , ,